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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 220 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the folks that were elected with us, the senators that have arrived in the last five or ten years. i think we have the ability to respond in a big, bold way to the crises that face us. and i know senator merkley, you came here a young man with senator hatfield i believe and you saw a different senate. maybe you could talk about that and we don't want to stay, i know we're going to a caucus and we have our generous chair here, so we don't want to keep her up there too long, our presiding officer. anyway, senator merkley, i yield. mr. merkley: i think my colleague from new mexico is absolutely right in pointing out there were periods when the senate really worked to address the big issues facing america. and it wawnltd that there weren't -- wasn't that there weren't profound differences. there were fierce differences, emotional differences, deep differences but folks came to this floor, they conversed, they laid out their arguments and ultimately they made decisions about which way to go. and they didn't bring the attitude let's just paralyze this chamber from doing doing nothing. had they d
with an election victory. >> did germany's education minister plagiarize her phd? her university launches an investigation. talk about putting a cap amongst the pigeons a day after german and french leaders pledged to deepen e u's economic and monetary union. the british prime minister has signaled his country could want out. >> in a very -- delayed speech, david cameron said he wants to renegotiate the terms of britain's membership and the referendum, but not until the end of 2017. >> that has rattled london's biggest allies and some investors. more uncertainty and possible of people are not what they have been wishing for. >> kamen said he'd campaigned for es you vote, saying he had won the decisions he had -- the concessions he had campaigned on. >> the move had long been anticipated at home and across the european union. david cameron laid out his vision of britain's future. it is one that involves major changes and giving the british public a say in what happens. >> when that referendum comes, let me say now that if we can negotiate such an arrangement, i will campaign for it with al
>> one of the first to cast the vote in israel's election. you're watching "al jazeera." we meet a boy who feels betrayed by the world. the u.n. intervenes in the south china seas. police officers in mexico say they have had enough. israelis are voting in their general election. binyamin netanyahu is a clear favorite to win another term in office. we're covering the election for us of there. is it shaping up? .> we're in west jerusalem there have been a steady trickle of voters coming and. sraelis are is re eligible to vote. it looks like to be a good turnout. the question is to what extend binyamin netanyahu can claim a mandate for victory. prime minister binyamin netanyahu casting his ballot. >> want them to succeed. >> he has a commanding lead in all polls. there are new kids on israel's political bloc. >> he is trying to make this campaign a personal campaign on his ability to be the prime minister. yes or no? specific questions about policies. >> the votes have been dominating the headlines. the likud party ran on a single ballad. have lost support to this man. they appealed
elections, is thinking fast or has been over the past two weeks of the popularity threshold and angela merkel has been riding and both of their parties are dithering. the sbc slightly inching higher and the sdu inching lower and they're both losing ground in a grander scale. it's the small parties that are the winners, definitely the green wes a record high of over 13%. they're the ones that won the election and lost it for the cdu, not stoeshl democrats themselves. and the liberals, the sdp, many had counted them out and there was an expectation or there was a fear for some that they couldn't even make the century hurdle that you need to get into parliament. they beat that. about you also for the personality ratings and the criticism on a federal scale, but that was his home turf so there was a lot of sympathy vote going in there. the big parties will have to look carefully for coalition partners. the social democrats will try to align themselves with the green that might not be enough. the stronger the greens get, the more the social democrats usually lose and something similar you h
pushed back hard. >> rose: we conclude this evening with the a look at the surprising elections in israel with david remnick, mort zuckerman, and dennis ross. >> i don't want us to be deluded and think because lapid somehow got an outsized amount of votes suddenly the country has moved dramatically to the left. it has not. it has not. and i think we need to have a more tragic sense of what's going on in terms of the palestinian question, which is the one that concerns us the most. certainly it is in the top three of the big questions about israel. and there's not going to be dramatic movement on that at all. >> rose: what happened in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans were killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton's testimon
in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans were killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton's testimony had been post toned until now. she took responsibility and emsized her commitment to improving diplomat security abroad. >> as i have mentioned many times i take responsibility and nobody is more committed to getting this right. i am determined to leave the state department and our country safer, stronger, and more secure. now, taking responsibility meant moving quickly in those first uncertain hours and days to respond to the immediate crisis, but, also, to further protect our people and posts in high-threat areas across the region and the world. it meant launching an independent investigation to determine exactly what happened in b
netanyahu's right-wing coalition wins a narrow victory in israel's general election. a centrist party makes an unexpected strong showing. >>> welcome to nhk world "newsline." experts following the move buys north korea are watching the clock. they say it's only a matter of time before the country carries out another nuclear test. north korean leaders promised to boost their military power in reaction to a u.n. security council resolution condemning their recent rocket launch. security council members passed the resolution unanimously. it expands existing sanctions, adding four individuals and six organizations, including the space agency. assets will be frozen and the individuals will also face a travel ban. officials in pyongyang are showing defiance. >> this suggests north korean authorities are prepared to conduct a third nuclear tests following ones in 2006 and 2009. they also declared they will no longer recognize a joint statement in 2005 from the six party talks on their nuclear development. that includes plans for the country to abandon all nuclear weapons and programs. officials fr
were reelected in the general election here in 2015, it would be part of their mandate and the platform that there would offer the british people and in-out referendum around 2018. so five years from now. the great concern of this, even if there is agreement in the european union, the great concern is that now a leading prime minister from a leading european country has said the sellout and other european countries might follow suit. the worry in big european capitals like paris and berlin is whether this will be criticized and if europe will only be as strong as its most skeptical parts. and the worry is that europe might start to collapse from the outside in words. so i don't think that they will take this speech very kindly one bit. i certainly don't think that they will want to acknowledge the kind of change that mr. chairman has said is necessary. >> israel's prime minister and his right-wing bloc has done worse than expected in parliamentary elections. benjamin netanyahu is coming victory. now he has to negotiate with other fiscal parties to form a broader coalition. >> i am proud
an inflation target of 2%. >>> people in israel are casting ballots in a prime election. benjamin netanyahu is expected to keep his job. >>> welcome to nhk "newsline." central bank policy makers have agreed to give shinzo abe what he wants, a 2% inflation target. it's part of abe's plan to tackle deflation with bolder, monetary easing measures. bank of japan and eight others agreed on it saying they. boj officials have previously made it a goal to bring 1% inflation within reach but the new, clearer target requires some bold steps. the document also addresses the role of the government in revitalizing japan's economy. it describes how politicians should promote growth and restore fiscal health. along with drafting the joint statement, boj officials have agreed to introduce open-ended asset purchasing. under a new program from january 2014 the central bank will purchase a certain amount of financial assets every month. no termination date is being set for the scheme. the new measure will expand the total size of the asset purchase program, or app, by about 10 trillion yen, or $110 billion, i
to be an obstructionist party. they read the election results and they'll make nice on some things. but it will be very tough going for him. not to say it is impossible, but don't try to do too many things. president clinton who in many ways was a very effective president, he loved to undertake 75 or 80 things on at once. president obama can't do that. his number one priorities have to be peace, world peace, of course, number one, and number two take what is happening now with the economy and move it forward. jobs, jobs, jobs. and his number three problem is he faces a staunchly obstructionist party in opposition. i would expect him to concentrate on trying to get his health reform package, otherwise known as obama care, sort of put in concrete. it's still vulnerable in places. and tweak it. i'll be very surprised if he doesn't make that if not his first priority, his number one legislative priority. >> grover norquist, do you have your battering rams ready for the president? the debt ceiling bustup to come. the republicans making clear they'll fight him all the way on that. i get a sense the president
. how are elected officials going to take the leadership that is necessary to do that? they have to hear from their constituents. we have to do the training of adults. we have to mobilize them. we have to engage them. we need them to share their experiences with the elected officials and congretional folks. without that engagement, that mobilization, we see so many pieces of legislation dying. >> i wonder, as much as we have to mobilize here, i want to focus on the fact this is an international problem. if you are spewing carbons in new jersey, they cross the border into canada. how do we begin to think of an international focus here? >> it's been a problem for a long time. the u.s. is consuming more than our population. it's affected the rest of the world. now we have problems like india and china are consuming based on an american model. they want what we want and they want to do it the way we did it. that means that you can't have any sort of climate agreement without everyone coming to the table. republicans used that as an excuse to do nothing. china is doing nothing -- no, it doesn
east. but because of elections, elections, today governments across the middle east in egypt, tunisia, libya, pal stipe, turkey, iraq -- palestine, turkey, iraq, they are all pursuing at least, at least independent foreign policies which are by definition much less enthusiastic about strategic cooperation with the united states and much more open to the islamic republic of iran. simply put, today the united states is in a profoundly weaker position in the middle east, and the islamic republic of rapp is in a significantly -- of iran is in a significantly stronger position. that has essentially happened because there has been a dramatic shift in the middle east balance of power. in our book, "going to tehran," we describe how part of why this shift has and is occurring is because of mistakes in american policies in the middle east. but we also describe in our book that part of what is going on is something vastly upside appreciated in -- underappreciated in the west which are the successes of the islamic republic of iran which are also driving the shift in the regional balance of power
of egypt and now you want to kill their families. we tell the president we helped you get elected. we are the grandchildren of people who fought against the 1966 invasion. we sacrifice their youth for this country for generations. >> we always pay the place -- we always pay the price with our blood and with their children. why? >> it's not clear where the gun shots that provoked the police came from. with violence spreading different parts of the city, the military camp guarded government buildings. protesters attacked a police station and torched the club. military helicopters have been hovering as this situation here remains tense. the violence has left the part of the city looking like a ghost town with people huddled in their homes fearing more deaths. go to the conflict in mali now where a conflict by french and mali and forces against islamic forces are making significant gains. the french and mali and troops have reached timbuktu. they reclaimed a strategically important town in the northeast. the fight to regain total control continues elsewhere. there have been french air str
elections, drowning out the voices of ordinary american citizens eager to participate in the political process. citizens united also epitomizes the so-called corporate personhood movement in which some now say the corporations are people. the fact is corporations are not people, and the constitution was never intended to give corporations the same rights as the american people. corporations don't breathe. they don't have kids, and they don't die in wars. my constituents continue to express concern about the growing influence of corporations in our political discourse. they're also demanding action on campaign finance reform because they are repulsed by the large amount of money in our campaigns. and quite frankly, they want elected officials to spend more time on policy, deliberating and debating on issues and less time dialing for dollars. unfortunately, the republican leadership in the house has failed to address these pressing issues during the past two years. they have been indifferent. we haven't had the opportunity to vote on any legislation to curb the influence of unlimited and
-span.org. >> millionaire investor and republican foster freeze spoke to reporters about the 2012 elections and the future of the republican party. he backed rick santorum in the presidential race. this hour long event in washington, d.c. was hosted by the christian science monitor. >> okay, here we go. i'm dave cook from the monitor. thanks for coming. our guest this morning is foster, visiting our fair city from his home in jackson, wyoming, accompanied by one of his advisers, matthew taylor. he was born in rice lake, wisconsin and earned his degree in business administration at the university of wisconsin where he met his wife, lynn. he served two years as an army intelligence officer, and then he founded freeze associates, an investment firm whose funds were wildly successful. he sold a controlling interest in the firm in 2001, but remains as chairman of freeze sorts and director of randy funds, and in recent years, focused on philanthropy and political activism including being the largest donor to senator santorum's 2012 political campaign. all of that, hunting the occasional 14-foot crocodile in tan
have real challenges. and we did get whipped in the presidential election. and that's not something that we take lightly. >> but so far, there is no consensus about how to fix them. republican national committee chairman, reince priebus, is expected to be re-elected today, after quietly making nice with ron paul supporters and heading off any challenge to his leadership. he'll call for a, quote, republican renewal, in a speech this afternoon. but the rnc committee drafting the plan for change is made up of party insiders, rather than anyone who's likely to break china. meanwhile, republican governors are griping privately and publicly that the gop in washington is doing nothing to help the republican brand, after being schooled by new jersey governor chris christie. washington republicans got a talking-to last night from louisiana governor, bobby jindal, who said the gop has to stop being a stupid party and talk like adults. >> today's conservatism is completely wrapped up in solving the hideous mess that is the federal budget. we have seemed to have an obsession with government boo
the racial progress our society has made, on the civil rights movement to the re- election of president obama, the pervasive association with black people and the ghetto betrays a persistent cultural lag. it has been two generation since .chools were desegregated if till were alive today, would remember stories of lynchings peppering the "new york times." he would remember the william man -- million -man march. a black man became president of the united states. he would have been 73 had he lived. thank you. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> we have been joined by taylor branch. i will just let you know that we have been speaking. douglas blackmon spoke. elijah anderson spoke. i would invite you to the podium and talk about the attempted second emancipation proclamation. ladies and gentlemen, taylor branch. [applause] >> thank you. thanks, paul. i don't want to pay tribute to the marc commuter line. i was only on for two extra hours. i am glad to be here. i want to pay tribute to the " washington month
in the past election. host: on twitter -- james in dickinson, texas, democratic caller. caller: good morning. that was a great speech that the president and vice president spoke yesterday. i have been watching it ever since it came on. i want to say hello to my pastor at the baptist church. i'm sure he's listening, and to all the church members. host: a little bit more from president obama's speech yesterday, talking about defending democracy abroad. [video clip] >> we still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. [[cheers and applause] our brave men and women in uniform tempered by the flames of battle are unmatched in skill and courage. our citizens, feared by the memory of those we have lostthoseknow too well the price it has paid for liberty. the knowledge of their sacrifice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm. but we are also heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war. we have turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends and we must carry those lessons into this time as well. we will defend our people and
an inflation target of 2%. >>> people in israel are casting ballots in a general election. prime minister netanyahu is expected to keep his job. but the country may shift further to the right. >>> welcome to nhk "newsline." japan's central bank policymakers agreed to give shinzo abe what he's been pushing for, a 2% inflation target. it's included in the boj plan with the government. it's part of abe's plan to tackle deflation with bolder, monetary easing measures. bank of japan governor and eight other board members agreed on a policy at the end of a two-day meeting. the announcement says financial authorities will try to reach the target at their earliest possible time. boj officials have previously made it a goal to bring 1% inflation within reach but the new, clearer target requires some bold steps. the document also addresses the role of the government in revitalizing japan's economy. it describes how politicians should promote growth and restore fiscal health. along with drafting the joint statement, boj officials have agreed to introduce open-ended asset purchasing. under a new prog
banks are putting in. we're through the u.s. elections, ahead of the debt ceiling debate. in some sense there isn't an immediate crisis. it's a question now whether ceos can get through the real economic fundamentals. in some ways we're betwiked and between, kelly. >> i like the scarf, ross. >> yeah. that's the point. look, there's plenty to come on our coverage today. let me recap some of the people we're going to be talking to. john lipinski, formerly of the imf. and hamish tyrwhitt, construction group out of australia. we saw rates dip a little today. suggesting there's room to cut rates. and the executive dean of peking university. we're more relaxed about china, more relaxed than three or four months ago. we'll get the inside there. all of that is coming up on today's "worldwide exchange." how are the markets looking? >> perfect. we'll check the markets in a second. i want to bring news out of the bank upon spain saying fourth quarter gdp was down 1.not -- 1.7% drop, it was .6 drop. pretty large. and 2012 gdp down 1.3%, down from a contraction of 0.4% in 2011. more difficult news f
at the numbers. 55 democrats, 45 republicans currently. in 2014, 33 seats will be up for re-election. don't go the way of general elections. congressman frost what do you think is going to happen? >> well, first of all, this is a subject i know a fair amount about. i was chairman of the democratic congressional campaign committee in 1998, the last time you had the so-called six year itch when the president's party is supposed to lose seats in the sixth year of the president's term. we actually picked up five seats in the house and we broke even in the senate. but what is happening here is that the republican party actually had this same opportunity in 2010 and 2012 and they nominated candidates that were too far to the right and lost some races they shouldn't have lost that happened in missouri and in indiana and in this last election it happened in delaware and colorado and nevada two years before that we will have to see what happens. if the republican party keeps nominating people too far to the right, they may snatch defeat out of jaws of victory once again. >> interesting you brought up t
that is different this time. because of something very simple. and that is what happened in the last election to republicans. particularly mitt romney with the latino voters. he lost big time. and that's why when i asked senator mccain and others who were standing right here where i'm standing, half a dozen years ago, why this is different, that's why they answered that way. listen to this. senator kennedy stood with you and, senator mccain, you were standing with him, and he said 2007 is the year we must fix our broken system. we must strike while the iron is hot. what makes you think, why is this year different? >> elections. elections. >> the republican party is losing the support of our hispanic citizens. and we realize that there are many issues in which we thing we're in agreement with our hispanic sit steps but this is a preeminent issue for those citizens. >> wolf, it's important to underscore that we really did see some of the people who have been here before, with senator kennedy and others half a dozen years ago, but some newborn faces like marco rubio who of course is an up and co
that we chiefs are buying this is because they were appointed by mayors who were elected who are telling them precisely what to do. urban centers -- if i may finish -- urban centers are a liberal bastion. that is not result in warm and fuzzy feelings for the second amendment. >> that is where we see the massacres occurring is in places where guns are banned. you look over the past 20 years all the shooting massacres would occur in places where guns were banned. the ultimate hypocrisy that there is 1800 cops guarding our congressmen on any given day that is why these tragedies are occurring. [talking over each other] [talking over each other] lou: i think we can agree with this. it's a lot more complicated than that. i would say to both sides, do not oversimplify and let's maintain at least some intellectual discussion. mental health in the and the treatment is a relevant issue that should be discussed. these shootings are far more the responsibility of people who are mentally ill and who have not received appropriate treatment than they are of guns. >> go down the list. [talking over eac
, george w. bush. another poll shows since president obama was re-elected, just a third of voters think he has been more bipartisan. but the majority, 55% say he's been more confrontational. does this mean nothing can really get done that's meaningful in washington to solve our nation's national debt and help the economy? we have a former white house political director under president george w. bush and a former chief of staff to west virginia senator joe mansion. >> great to be here. >> eric: matt, let me start with you. how do we get here? >> well, you know, i think about the president i served, george w. bush. when he came to office, he really was concerned about trying to if i understand a way to reach across the aisle because clearly bill clinton left the presidency with high numbers. he worked with ted kennedy. he worked with democrats and signature domestic policy issues and then 9/11 happened and the wars occurred. really, the nation polarized again, right versus left. i don't think we have come out of that. obama inherited that. but he talked about bridging that and governing in a
there. >> one interpretation of the election is that fracking cost mitt romney the presenthe presi. it really did make a significant difference in what turned out to be swing states. >> it did. >> and not think oklahoma was in place. -- i do not think oklahoma was in place. [laughter] >> our company has doubled the size of our employment base there. we are not huge employers yet. 750 people. that is double what we were three years ago. >> one of the environmental challenges, people worry about what you put down the wells in fracking, but it is mostly water and sand. the problem is what comes up. there is naturally occurring radioactive material down there. there is our sncc, barry m.. -- arsenic, barium. in the early days they would turn the water over to the municipal water authorities, who would water it down until they got down to the legal toxicity levels, and then dump it. the problem was, what do we do with all this waste water. they have decided, let's not a bit. they figured out ways to fill the water -- dum pit. they figured out ways to filter the water. >> that was someth
be more tkeufpbt it turned out t difficult it turned out to be. it was a narrow election. he has that ahead of him. not to mention the things that haunt a second term which none of us can imagine today. >> you can see former president clinton and secretary of state clinton. who is going to be testifying before congress in a less friendly atmosphere later this week. i was reading obama's first inaugural address today, because i thought, you know, let's get a sense of what it is that he said four years ago. i want to read you two lines. on this day we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and falls promises the recriminations and warn out doug mas that for far too long have strangled our politics. that is an incomplete at best. not all the president's fault but also counterparts on capitol hill. but we are still strangled by that kind of division. talking about national security and the global war on terror, we reject as false the choice between our safety and our ideals. that was part of the promise he was going to make to shut down guantanamo, to end enhanced interrogat
the short term. >> let's delve into more of the causes of it, the election result, and this may be a false choice, but to what extent do you think the outcome had to do with romney's weaknesses as an anecdote and how much had to do with the content he was trying to sell and perhaps the staleness of it, how much was just circumstances, the economy wasn't bad enough to fire obama and the republican party, its brand was still being dragged down with the association through the financial crisis in iraq and sundry other leftovers of the bush years? >> i think the clearest way to look at this is to look at 2010. 2010 was a resounding rejection of what obama had done in the first two years. it was a resounding rejection of the inintrusiveness expansion of the government. it essentially was a referendum on this kind of hyper liberalism and a referendum on the question of the size, the scope, the reach of government, and it was kind of a pure ideological election, because there were no personalities involved. you weren't voting for a president, you weren't voting up and down on a figure, you were v
had an election over that issue. we're having a debate in congress every day over that issue. until this point, the president has not indicated post election that he's all that happy about addressing the mandatory spending issue. and we can't get there until he does because without his leadership, no matter what the congress cobbles together in the regard, it's not going go forward. and so, that to me is the challenge of the day. it has a significant play on our national security, our ability to fund the military so it can engage where we need it to engage. we can't solve everything through drones. and that has major implications on the diplomacy, foreign aid, and in particular because it's way down the priority list of the american spending. and so that is the overarching issue, and i have to say, absent in intervening, like we had in 9/11, it's all of a sudden that priority became number one and everybody rallied around the impee -- impetus for changing our policy. we want to do everything we can do to keep that intervening event from happening. that causes us to reorient our thin
. >> jennifer: so we saw the same sentiment emerge in israel's elections this week too. the electorate pushed back against conservative benjamin netenyahu. and a new leader gave voice. >> [ inaudible ] these are generations left because of israel's middle class can no longer survive the economics. >> jennifer: his party won the second-most seats after netenyahu's. so this movement really does seem to have some legs and not just in the middle east. we're seeing similar concerns in china. there a boom in highly educated young people has significantly changed the work force in china in the last decade. china now has 11 times as many college students as it did in 1999. and while that sounds like good news, the economy hasn't produced enough white collar jobs, so many of those graduates are unemployed, and wages are stagnated, so this is the challenging new world john kerry is going to face. good news is there is no one more prepared to face it. joining us from skype is zbigniew brzezinski. he is a counselor and trustee at the senator for strategic and international studies.
to not comment between the election and inauguration because i wanted to see what kind of president we are looking at here. what kind of path he was putting his administration on, and all of the statements and comments lead me to my he is thinking more of a political conquest than political compromise. >> we will have more on that in just a moment. >>> also, a big week ahead in washington. hillary clinton set to step down as secretary of state this week and the gnat will hold a hearing on kerry to replace her. meantime in a new interview with the new republic president obama says gun control advocates need to listen to their opponents and understand and respect the tradition of hunting. he added that he enjoys skeet shooting at camp david. president weighed in on the dangers of football. they have been making headlines lately. he said if he had son he is not sure he would let his son play football. head over to the white house right now. peter alexander, some interesting stuff in that interview the president gave the new pacific republic, not just football and skeet shooting. >> that's
, his inaugural speech was very domestically focused. look, we just had elections in israel, john kerry not in the same place benjamin netanyahu is regarding a two-state solution, at least right now. there are huge challenges, iran, there are huge challenges in the foreign policy front that don't get talked about as much, but are clearly things that not only will be difficult for the president and his team to navigate, but will also have a significant say in how this president is viewed by history. >> and, by the way, we just got word that the white house is going to proceed with a nomination of general allen to be the nato supreme allied commander now that he's been cleared by the pentagon investigation going back to the petraeus case. thanks to all of you, david sanger and kelly o'donnell, of course, and chris cillizza, see you later. thanks very much. >>> clinton today put a lot of blame on congress for withholding aid. >> we have to get our act together between the administration and congress. if this is a priority and if we are serious about trying it help this government stand up
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 220 (some duplicates have been removed)